bloodpactgirlscout:

Please tell me I am not the only person who imagines Tamika Flynn to look like Lavender from Matilda

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Look at those goddamn glasses and those cute little braids.

That is 100% the face of a librarian-killing master of reading comprehension skills.

(via swingsetindecember)

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(via ofgeography)

IF (but I can be convinced)

So IF I was going to write a Maleficent!AU for Steve/Bucky, theyd both be magical creatures who were always best friends. Only, Bucky would be tall and have huge dark wings and Steve would be tiny and leave trails of sparkles behind him (which he grumbled about most of their childhood because the sparkles got in EVERYTHING).

Only Bucky would be caught after a battle with the human king and they’d cut off his wings in front of him, shave the bones right now to the skin and they’d spend years convincing him that he had been human all along, that the fairies had stolen him and the scars on his back were from them mistreating him when he was a child. And he’d not quite believe them but he does know that the iron castle hurts and everything is a constant pain that never numbs and they only let him breathe fresh air outside when they send him to kill some hapless fairy who’s wandered out of the forest.

And Steve would make a deal with the sea witch—a woman who’s sharp-eyed and cruel for a given value of cruel but who always holds to her bargains—and he trades a heart of ice for being big enough and strong enough to go save Bucky.

If I was writing a Maleficent!AU.

caughtinanocean said: Steve/Bucky, "Please come get me."

steverogersorbust:

You’re eighteen and you’re going to die.

You’re small and you’re sick and the doctors are amazed you made it to your tenth birthday, let alone that you’re still breathing. So maybe you should count your blessings that you made it this far. But it makes you mad, because it ain’t fever or disease that’s gonna kill you now.

It’s your own goddamned mouth.

You have no patience for bullies, is all. Watching someone abuse their power, well. It slips under your skin and stirs up the devil inside. And since your fists are useless—you pretend otherwise, but know better—the only weapons you can use are your mind, which is quick and keen, and your words, which are sharp and knowing. “Like a knife, Stevie,” Bucky says, when you get particularly ornery. “Shoved right under a fella’s ribs, cut ‘em straight through.”

You sometimes forget, when Bucky sounds so proud of your skill, that others don’t take too kindly to being heckled.

The foot to your ribs is reminding you now.

Read More

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Cast | Madame Tussauds Hollywood MARVEL Wax Figures.

(via dammit-mcu)

I really loved the way Cap’n Jack would always gather everyone around him in an emotionally-vulnerable-but-still-definitely-prioritizing-physical-contact way. It was very him.

(via emilianadarling)

Book Meme

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you. Tag [ten] friends, including me, so I’ll see your list. Make sure you let your friends know you’ve tagged them.

1. The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle. The exchange between the woman who was too old to be the maiden fair and the unicorn she used to long for is one of the most important things in all of literature to me.

2. The History Boys, Alan Bennett. The line “I’m not happy, but I’m not unhappy about it” has been my lodestone for a very long time.

3. Americanah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. I feel like this book edged slowly into the center of me and has taken root there. I find myself contemplating it even though it’s been months since I read it. It was all I could think about while I was reading it too.

4. His Dark Materials Series, Phillip Pullman. The only thing more powerful and moving than the sacrifice Will and Lyra make is the simple idea itself that it’s all worth it to let the dead be scattered like dust in the wind, that that’s the happy ending.

5. The Black Cauldron, Lloyd Alexander. All the victories in the Prydain series are gorgeous and come with tiny lessons wrapped up in twists and riddles, but this book’s solution is the one that actually broke my child heart once upon a time.

6. Mill on the Floss, George Eliot. If I had the power to make Eliot a god, I’d do it in exchange for another line like “if the past is not to bind us, where can duty lie?” That line haunts me.

7. Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare. I have loved Beatrice my whole life and I don’t think I’ll stop anytime soon.

8. “Purple Cow,” Gelett Burgess. I have both this poem and the sequel memorized and have had them memorized since pre-puberty. This is some poetry perfection, I’ll tell you that much.

9. Night Watch, Terry Pratchett. Possibly the book I love most.

10. The whole damn Animorphs series. But seriously…..we shouldn’t talk about this series. There’s an equal possibility that I could either cry big snotty tears while clutching onto your shirt or go scream in pure rage into a pillow until I pass out. 50/50.

captainbisexual:

it doesn’t matter how many “pretend to be dating” fics i read, i’m always fucking in it headfirst every time and i fall for that shit every time. i know the pattern i know the plot twists i know what’s gonna happen but every single fucking time i’m fucking on the edge of my seat wide-eyed whispering like “what’s gonna happen are they gonna fall in love” to myself like of course they are you fucking idiot this happens EVERY TIME but as soon as i see the description and it’s like “x person and x person pretend to do the dating” it’s eternal sunshine of the stupidest fucking mind over here

(via therealdeepsix)

lycheelovescomics:

90’s Storm’s outfits appreciation post! (x)

(via dammit-mcu)

  • me: this fic fucked me up so bad and i cried for hours
  • me: here read it